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Juvenile Generalized Demodicosis in a Dog

Published: 11/27/2019

Confirm or correct your understanding of the usefulness and safety of a variety of drug choices for this patient in this article from Clinician’s Brief, our official clinical practice journal, written by​ Andrew Rosenberg, DVM, DACVD, Animal Dermatology and Allergy Specialists, White Plains, NY, Riverdale, NJ, USA.

A 6-month-old spayed American pit bull terrier crossbreed is presented for evaluation of severe pruritus and multifocal areas of alopecia and erythema. When the owners rescued the dog 2 months prior, the dog was pruritic around the eyes and licked its paws. The skin has since become progressively worse and the dog has gotten progressively more pruritic. The owners have been feeding a strict limited-ingredient diet without improvement.

Physical examination reveals crusts on the lateral cervical region and diffuse erythroderma. All distal limbs and both dorsal and ventral aspects of all paws are severely erythematous and crusted. The ventral abdomen and inguinal region have multifocal papules and pustules. An impression smear reveals intracellular and extracellular cocci bacteria (too numerous to count) with streaming neutrophils. Deep skin scrapings from the right forepaw and dorsal muzzle reveal 15 live adult Demodex canis mites, 2 juvenile Demodex canis mites, and 5 Demodex canis eggs per slide.

 

Which of the following drugs would be appropriate for this patient?

Based on the information provided, how would you grade the following drugs and why?

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The following represent the best responses based on drug metabolism, pharmacokinetics, species, diagnostic differentials, clinical and laboratory data, and other pertinent findings.
 
Prednisone
Oclacitinib
Lokivetmab
Ivermectin
Sarolaner
Amitraz Dip
Enrofloxacin
Cephalexin
Benzoyl Peroxide Shampoo
Gentamicin/Betamethasone Spra

 
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